Home / Community / Forum / Poker Forum / Poker Ausbildung / Poker Handanalysen /

NL25 SH Starthands..... BB/100--- ???

Alt
Standard
NL25 SH Starthands..... BB/100--- ??? - 24-10-2007, 22:41
(#1)
Benutzerbild von flohx
Since: Aug 2007
Posts: 46
Hallo,
ich habe bisher ungefähr 10k hände fullring NL 25 gespielt mit 3,57bb/100 (nicht so toll).
Nun will ich mal ein paar Sessions mit SH probieren.
Aber habe leider absoluten keinen Plan wie ich SH spielen soll, also habe ich mich heute erstmal annen tisch gesetzt und en bisschen zugeguckt und ein paar Beobachtungen gemacht und ich hoffe das sie stimmen... korrekiert mich wenn ich mich irre, also:
1. SH ist um einiges aggressiver als FR (wer hätte es gedacht) und die Gegner probieren auch um einiges öfters Bluffs
2. Die wirklich guten Hände (Sets,Flush....) werden besser ausbezahlt
3. Die Gegner callen einen öfters bis zum river durch


Und nun zu meinen Fragen
-Wieviel BB/100 kann man SH durchschnittlich machen.
-Welche Hände sollte man aus welcher Position spielen/folden (so ein starthandchart wäre super); welchen VP$P-Wert sollte man ungefär haben.
-Reichen SH auch ungefähr 30stacks als Bankroll?
-Welchen Spielstil sollte man SH haben (tight-aggressiv?)

Ich freue mich sehr über euere Antworten und euch schonmal vielen dank
mfg
flohx
 
Alt
Standard
03-11-2007, 05:58
(#2)
Benutzerbild von Axeman80
Since: Aug 2007
Posts: 10
Mach dir über deine Winrate noch keine Gedanken, 10k Hände sagen nicht viel aus. Und so schlecht sind 3,57 BB/100 Hände nun auch nicht.

Zu deinen Fragen was das SH-Spiel angeht:

Als Bankroll solltest du in etwa 25-30 Buy-ins haben. Das hängt allerdings auch von deiner eigenen Komfortzone ab. SH ist deutlich swingiger als FR, und swings von 10 stacks down sind keine Seltenheit. Wenn dir also Limitabstiege nicht so liegen sollten, könnens auch mehr als die 25-30 Buy-sns sein. Die Winrate die du erwarten kannst, hängt natürlich vom Limit ab. Denke auf den Microlimits bis NL10 sollten 10 BB/100 Hände schaffbar sein, da das Niveau der Gegner dort doch sehr gering ist. Auf höheren Limits sind 5-6 BB/100 Hände solide Werte.
Als Spielstil kannst du entweder TAG bzw LAG spielen. Ist beides profitabel. Ich persönlich spiele den TAG-Style, und demzufolge basiert auch meine Starthand-Selektion darauf.

First in spiele ich wiefolgt:

UTG: Raise alle PP, AK-AJs, AK-AQo
MP : Raise alle PP, AK-ATs, AK-AJo
CU : Raise alle PP, AK-A8s, AK-ATo, KQ-KTs, KQo, QJs und beiweilen nen SC
BU : Raise alle PP, any Ace, KQ-K7s, KQ-KTo, sowie alle SC und onegapper ab 45 bzw 79, und OC ab 78.
Blinds : Raise alle PP, Ak-A9, KQ-KT, und evtl mal nen SC

Sobald du einen oder mehrere Caller vor dir hast, solltest du in deiner Raisingrange deutlich tighter werden, und bei vielen Limpern mit spekulativen Händen nur callen bzw. folden.
Des weiteren solltest du nicht stur nach Chart spielen, sondern dein Spiel an die Gegner anpassen. Sprich an nem passiven Tisch looser, und an nem aggressiven Tisch tighter spielen.

Wie du siehst spiele ich sehr aggressiv preflop, allerdings nur in den späten Positionen. Ich habe diese Range profitabel auf NL25 gespielt (Im Moment reizen mich SnG's und PLO mehr).
Mit dieser Range solltest du in etwa auf 23/19 Werte kommen.

Ich hoffe ich konnte dir weiterhelfen. Viel Erfolg.
 
Alt
Standard
03-11-2007, 07:59
(#3)
Benutzerbild von Branch_of_GG
Since: Oct 2007
Posts: 608
Ich quote hier mal einen post den ich glaubich mal aus 2+2 aufgeschnappt habe der den ganzen Stats aspekt wirklich gut summiert. Ich fand ihn aufjedenfalls sehr lesenswert.

Hoffe er ist dir auch hilfreich

Zitat:
The problem with stats is that having stats in line with typical values does not necessarily imply good play, nor does having stats out of line with typical values necessarily imply bad play. However, seeing that your stats are out of line can give you a quick diagnosis and a place to start looking for holes. Hopefully the information I've compiled and put in here will be used as a beginning, not an end, for improving play.

------------------------

VPIP and PFR:
These are easily the stats about which the most questions are asked, and the answer is farly imprecise. Following this starting hand chart will get you to about 23-25/14-16 or so, and that's pretty reasonable. If that feels too loose and too aggressive, you could consider tightening up somewhat until you get more comfortable, but if you're playing any tighter than 22/12, you're probably passing up on too many profitable opportunities. Some of the most experienced posters in HUSH play as aggressively as 30/20. This is pretty much the recommended maximum, and this is not recommended for players who are just getting started in 6 max play, or especially for those still fairly new to hold'em in general. The last thing to keep in mind is that you don't want to be playing 30/12 or 21/20. Your VPIP and PFR should increase (or decrease) cooperatively.

Given the same set of opponents, you should be playing exactly the same preflop as you would if it was folded to MP2 in a full ring game. If you find there are differences between the two, you may want to consider adjusting your play as appropriate so that the two match. While differences in your reads of the players at the two different games may dictate somewhat different plays, it's not anything fundamentally different between the two versions of the same game we know and love.

VPIP from SB: This stat varies from about 25% to about 40%, with 35% being a pretty happy medium. The tighter numbers often come from people playing in 5/10 6 max with a 2/5 blind structure. Naturally, you should play tighter in that case, and tightest of all in a 1/3 structure at 3/6. For 6 max play, you're going to have fewer opportunities where there enough limpers to make completing 72s a good idea (fewer limpers = lower implied odds), but you can complete some traditionally dubious hands for high card strength against one really bad limper.

Folded SB to steal: Typical values for this are around 85%, give or take 5%. When you're defending your SB against a steal, you almost always want to 3bet to take the initiative back, and to hopefully fold the BB rather than offer him 5:1 on the call. The set of hands you'd raise preflop is, understandably, the set from which you'd usually select hands for 3betting in SB defense. Given that typical PFR values will be 10-20%, having your fold SB to steal roughly equal to 100% - your PFR% is pretty reasonable. Again, if you play in a game where the SB is not equal to half of the BB, then this number should decrease somewhat. You have relatively less to defend.

Folded BB to steal: The decision about whether or not to defend your BB depends on a lot of factors, primarily what range of hands the theif is raising (does he even steal, or is this raise legitimate?), your read on the theif's postflop play, and how comfortable you are with defending. Having this be at 70% is not a bad place to start out your 6 max play, but getting it down to 60% or so would probably be better. You can play a lot of hands getting good pot odds, especially since the theif's hand range will be large. If the SB comes along and offers you 5:1, you can really open up. Some veterans have this stat below 50%, but, again, that's not recommended for players new to 6 max play who might be less familiar with defending their blinds. A lot of the difference between your VPIP and your PFR comes from defending your BB - you won't be limping much.

Attempt to steal blinds: Following the above chart will get you to about 30% or so, which, again, is pretty reasonable. As you get more comfortable and get better reads on your opponents, you can increase that somewhat (or decrease, if appropriate). Much above 40%, however, and even the worst players will start to catch on to what your doing.

Aggression factors: Postflop aggression factors for 6 max play will tend to be higher than for full ring play, but not too much higher. They should also generally decrease by street. Flop aggression will tyipcally be between 2.5 and 3.5. Any higher than 3.5 and you're probably overplaying (looking for autobetting after PFR in bad situations is a good place to start if this describes you) and/or playing fit or fold. River will typically be between 1.5 and 2.5. Much higher than that, and you're probably folding too many winners. I've seen some posters with stats that look like 3.5/2.5/1.6, and other similarly successful posters with stats that look more like 2.9/2.7/2.5. It's not entirely clear which style is more profitable due to sample size issues, but both can be quite profitable. I guess you guys can debate the merits of each style in this thread if you have an opinion, or especially some data. I'd be especially curious to hear from people who've played both styles: not only to hear which they prefer, but also what they did to their postflop play that resulted in the transition.

This stat, though, is one to be particularly careful with. Don't increase or decrease your aggression for stats' sake. Look at hands and learn when to choose your spots.

Went to showdown: Marginal hands will tend to have more value when there are fewer players involved. Expect to show down more hands. A value of about 32 is probably about as low as is reasonable, and 40%-ish is about the ceiling. Typical values are 35-38%. As you add hands, this may decrease slightly, but if you're only adding hands that you end up folding before showdown, it's time to rethink about adding those hands. Also, if you play aggressively enough (and/or against tight enough opponents) that many hands don't make it to showdown, this will tend to decrease.

Won $ at showdown: This stat should be pretty much in line with typical full ring stats: 50-60%. Your marginal hands that you end up showing down will have more value, but they're still marginal. If this number is too high, you may be running hot or not showing down enough marginal hands. If it's too low, you may be guilty of calling down with jack high and need to review which hands are marginal, and which are still trash, even at 6 max.

Position Stats tab: Primarily make sure that you're getting looser and more aggressive preflop as you move from UTG to the button. The actual numbers are not particularly important if your main stats are in line, but that general trend should certainly be there.

Misc. Stats tab: Krishan Leong did an interesting study to estimate how hot or cold you are running. He looked at the data from many good players Misc. Stats tab to come up with percentages of how often you should win with each kind of hand, and roughly how often you should get a straight, flush or full house (1 in every 200 hands or so, and this has little to do with the quality of your play). Rather than rehash his entire post here, take a look at it yourselves. Make sure that when you're looking at your stats here, you have the "Show Only Hands That Were Not Folded" box checked. Looking at this information can be reassuring that you're not all that bad at poker, as well as keeping you grounded if you're running unsustainably hot. Playing at the microlimits (his data is from 5/10+), you may be able to sustain somewhat higher W$@SD percentages with your various hands, since you'll get to showdown more often with people who are more willing to show down losing hands, but they probably won't be all that much higher in the long term.

Win rate and standard deviation: Well, I guess I'll put something in here about win rate. It's simultaneously the most important and the least important stat. Be happy with anything above 0, naturally, but I'll include how to calculate with what confidence you know you are a winning player. This applies to all poker, not just 6 max, and it has been covered elsewhere, but I'm including it here for completeness. First, get your standard deviation per 100 hands from the Session Notes tab ---> More Detail. Divide that value by sqrt(N/100), the square root of the number of hands you've played divided by 100. That gives you the uncertainty (standard error) of your win rate, i.e., the accuracy to which you know your win rate after having played this many hands. As you can tell, it'll take quite a while to converge to within even as much as 0.1. Anyway, divide your current win rate by your uncertainty. This result, which I'll call Z, can be taken to a normal distribution table, like this one. Enter your Z into the "Below" box, and that's the probability you're actually a winning player. For the lazy ones among us, here are the cliff notes: Z = 1, there's an 84% chance you're a winning player, Z = 2, 98%, Z = 3, 99.999%, and Z = -1, 16%. As you can see from those numbers and a little figuring on your own with your standard deviation, it doesn't take all that many hands to know for near sure that you're a winning player. It should be equally apparent, however, that it's relatively likely for a winning 2+2er to have a negative Z over a reasonable stretch of hands.

------------------------

That's pretty much it for the stats that are easy to analyze. Most of the others take a while to converge and/or can be misleading because they talk about the frequency with which you bet, raise, call, check and fold, but say nothing about the appropriateness of those actions. If you're worried about those stats, it's better to examine the play of hands in which the particular action of interest (e.g., folding the river, check/raising the flop, etc.) comes up. Play good poker. Let those stats take care of themselves.
 
Alt
Standard
28-01-2008, 12:36
(#4)
Benutzerbild von belab
Since: Dec 2007
Posts: 28
ich finde diese starren starting hand charts nicht so gut - habe mich früher auch total starr daran gehalten und meine winrate war in etwa die selbe.
seit ich etwas mehr darauf achte was für eine art spieler im pot is (calling station,maniac) hab ich meine ranges aus den diversen positionen angepasst gegen mache spieler kann mann eben auch etwas looser reraisen oder mit connectors raises callen weil man weiss dass man 100% ausbezahlt wird sobald mann hittet/ oder freecards bis zum river erhält.
Zu der Anderen Antwort : ich finde ab 50 händen gekommt mann doch ein ganz gutes bild obs sich um extreme fische / maniacs handelt und dann ist es nur eine frage der zeit bis du sie dann stackst.
Für den Anfang finde ich die Chart aber ganz ok aber du solltest danacht trachten auch den gegner zu spielen nicht nur deine karten...
mfg belab
 
Alt
Standard
28-01-2008, 12:48
(#5)
Benutzerbild von belab
Since: Dec 2007
Posts: 28
ich finde diese starren starting hand charts nicht so gut - habe mich früher auch total starr daran gehalten und meine winrate war in etwa die selbe.
seit ich etwas mehr darauf achte was für eine art spieler im pot is (calling station,maniac) hab ich meine ranges aus den diversen positionen angepasst gegen mache spieler kann mann eben auch etwas looser reraisen oder mit connectors raises callen weil man weiss dass man 100% ausbezahlt wird sobald mann hittet/ oder freecards bis zum river erhält.
Zu der Anderen Antwort : ich finde ab 50 händen gekommt mann doch ein ganz gutes bild obs sich um extreme fische / maniacs handelt und dann ist es nur eine frage der zeit bis du sie dann stackst.
Für den Anfang finde ich die Chart aber ganz ok aber du solltest danacht trachten auch den gegner zu spielen nicht nur deine karten...
mfg belab
 
Alt
Standard
28-01-2008, 13:12
(#6)
Benutzerbild von oblom
Since: Nov 2007
Posts: 1.274
@Branch

Bist Du Dir sicher, dass es bei Deinem Zitat um NL geht, oder hast Du nicht doch eher ein FL-Posting erwischt?
 
Alt
Standard
28-01-2008, 14:15
(#7)
Benutzerbild von pl4n-G
Since: Nov 2007
Posts: 91
10k hände sind doch nix da kannste doch noch überhaupt keine aussage fällen. Ich würd ma noch nen paar hände mehr spielen und dann schauen wies aussieht. 10k sind einfach viel zu wenig.
 
Alt
Standard
29-01-2008, 08:22
(#8)
Benutzerbild von Muellfreak
Since: Aug 2007
Posts: 178
Zitat:
Zitat von flohx Beitrag anzeigen
Hallo,
Und nun zu meinen Fragen
-Wieviel BB/100 kann man SH durchschnittlich machen.
-Welche Hände sollte man aus welcher Position spielen/folden (so ein starthandchart wäre super); welchen VP$P-Wert sollte man ungefär haben.
-Reichen SH auch ungefähr 30stacks als Bankroll?
-Welchen Spielstil sollte man SH haben (tight-aggressiv?)
1. Zu den BB/100 HAenden kann man denke ich nur schwer eine Angabe machen, da es von mehreren Faktoren abhaengig ist. Zum einen sicherlich das Limit auf dem man spielt, zum anderen auf die eigene Spielstaerke und sicherlich auch auf die Varianz. Ich spiele selber noch nciht so lange SH, und schlage momentan NL20 SH mit etwa 12BB/100 Haenden nach 13.000 gespielten Haenden. Das heisst aber noch gar nichts. Wirklich aussagekraeftig werden die Winrates erst ab recht grossen SampleSizes. In manchen Communities spricht man von mehr als 150.000 Haenden. Habe aber bei 2+2 mal ein wenig fuer dich gewuehlt. Dort heisst es zum Beispiel:
"50.000 Hände: Nötige Gewinnrate = 20 Big Blinds
100.000 Hände: Nötige Gewinnrate = 12 Big Blinds
250.000 Hände: Nötige Gewinnrate = 8 Big Blinds
1.000.000 Hände: Nötige Gewinnrate = 4 Big Blinds"
Ob das so dem gaengigen entspricht weiss ich nicht. Habe aber in einem anderen Thread etwas interessantes gefunden, wo einem geraten wird, doch einfach 20.000 Haende zu spielen, und dann die Winrate betrachten. Ist man damit zufrieden, und man hat die BR, dann sollte man einen Aufstieg in Betracht ziehen. Sollte man nciht zufrieden sein, einfach nochmal 20.000 Haende spielen und wieder vergleichen. Das ist denke ich ein ganz guter Weg, den man beruecksichtigen sollte. Wenn man dann die oben genannten Milestones als Richtwert nimmt, dann kann man das schon ganz gut als Anhaltspunkte zur Winrate nehmen.

2. Ich habe festgestellt, dass SH doch um einiges dynamischer ist als FR, und ich bin der Meinung man sollte SH nicht unbedingt nach einem SHC spielen. Ich halte es so, dass ich meine Starthaende je nach Tisch und Situation aussuche. Die Regel der Raise-Hoehe bleibt die gleich wie beim FR. Allerdings wird um einiges aggressiver gespielt. Das stimmt schon. Intelli bietet auch eine Art SHC an fuer SH-Tische. Aber ich denke, wenn du dich mit dem FR-Spiel auseinandergesetzt hast, und die SHC dafuer im Kopf hast, kannst du sie Stueck fuer Stueck erweitern und durch eigenstaendiges Probieren einen fuer dich guten Spielplan erstellen. Wichtig ist vor allem, dass du aggressiv spielst. Sachen wie Open-Limpen sind an SH-Tischen einfach ein Fehler.
Zu den eigenen Spiel-Stats ist es auch schwer zu sagen. Auch da wird man fuendig, wenn man ein wenig in den Communities sucht. Als "Neuling" solltest du sicherlich erstmal etwas tighter spielen und dich an das neue Spiel gewoehnen. Wenn du dir deiner Sache sicherer bist, und auch dein Postflop-Spiel einigermassen gut ist, dann kannst du anfangen etwas looser zu spielen preflop. Ich selber habe beispielsweise mir 14/10/1,2 angefangen. Wenn ich jetzt mal die Werte VPIP/PFR/AF nehme. Inzwischen spiele ich 18/16/3,5. Das ist aber noch weiter ausbaufaehig. Mein Ziel wird es sein in naechster Zeit etwa auf 20/18 zu kommen, was sicherlich ertsmal ganz gut spielbar ist. Je nach "Koennen" gibt es auch Spieler die mit 35/28 erfolgreich spielen, aber dazu ist es in deinem Fall (und auch in meinem) noch deutlich zu frueh.
3. Wenn du dir bei Intelli mal die Artikel zu SH-Tischen durchliest, dann wird dir auffallen, dass einem geraten wird die Micros mit mindestens 40 Stacks zu spielen. Das liegt an der erhoehten Varianz und ist sicherlich keine schlechte Richtlinie. Ich persoenlich spiele eher ein aggressiveres BRM, was ich aber nicht unbedingt empfehlen moechte zu Beginn, wenn man kein "Reservepolster" hat. Solltest du dir deiner Sache sicher sein, kannst du sicherlich auch das naechste Limit shotten. Aber dazu findest du einen recht guten Artikel hier im Bereich der Ausbildung.
4. Zum Spielstil habe ich bei Punkt 2 schon was gesagt. enke zu Beginn ist das TAG-Spiel gar nicht schlecht, um sich an das Spiel zu gewoehnen. Aber nach und nach solltest du dein Spiel Stueck fuer Stueck looser gestalten.

Ich hoffe ich konnte dir weiterhelfen.
 
Alt
Standard
29-01-2008, 09:52
(#9)
Benutzerbild von belab
Since: Dec 2007
Posts: 28
sehr guter post muellfreak kann das alles nur aus eigener erfahrung bestätigen!!!
mfg belab
 
Alt
Standard
29-01-2008, 19:59
(#10)
Benutzerbild von coren86
Since: Aug 2007
Posts: 123
Was die Spielweise angeht, ist es SH wesentlich Situationsabhängiger. An den SH- Tischen gibt es soviele verschiedene Gegnertypen, das man sich finde ich sehr anpassen muss. Auf Pstars NL25 und niedriger findet sich meiner Meinung nach aber an jedem Tisch eine solche extreme Callingstation, dass man mit einem soliden semiTAG style bis TAG syle und solidem postflopspiel wirklich sehr gut fährt.

Meiner Meinung nach ist auf SH Tischen die Beobachtung der Spieler, Notes und Stats wesentlich wichtiger als bei FR und ich denke ab NL25 SH ist Pokertrack+ Poker Ace HUD oder ähnliches ein muss.

Good luck